Privacy Policy

SECTION 1 - WHAT DO WE DO WITH YOUR INFORMATION?

When you purchase something from our website, as part of the buying and selling process, we collect the personal information you give us such as your name, address and email address.

Email marketing: We send members regular emails with information on upcoming events, initiatives, and other pertinent information. You can opt out of these emails at any time by clicking the "unsubscribe" button at the bottom of the email.

SECTION 2 - CONSENT

How do you get my consent? When you provide us with personal information to complete a transaction, verify your credit card, place an order, arrange for a delivery or return a purchase, we imply that you consent to our collecting it and using it for that specific reason only.

If we ask for your personal information for a secondary reason, like marketing, we will either ask you directly for your expressed consent, or provide you with an opportunity to say no.

How do I withdraw my consent? If after you opt-in, you change your mind, you may withdraw your consent for us to contact you, for the continued collection, use or disclosure of your information, at anytime, by contacting us at info@whitsundaycoastchamber.com.au or mailing us at: Whitsunday Coast Chamber of Commerce, PO Box 96, Airlie Beach, QLD Australia 4802

SECTION 3 - DISCLOSURE

We may disclose your personal information if we are required by law to do so or if you violate our Terms of Service.

SECTION 4 - BUSINESS CATALYST

Our store is hosted on Adobe Business Catalyst They provide us with the online e-commerce platform that allows us to sell our products and services to you. Your data is stored through Adobe's data storage, databases and the general Adobe application. They store your data on a secure server behind a firewall.

Payment:If you use a credit card to complete your purchase, then your credit card data is stored via eWay. It is encrypted through the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS). Your purchase transaction data is stored only as long as is necessary to complete your purchase transaction. After that is complete, your purchase transaction information is deleted.

All direct payment gateways adhere to the standards set by PCI-DSS as managed by the PCI Security Standards Council, which is a joint effort of brands like Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover. PCI-DSS requirements help ensure the secure handling of credit card information by our store and its service providers. For more insight, you may also want to read about Eway's technology and security.

SECTION 5 - THIRD-PARTY SERVICES

In general, the third-party providers used by us will only collect, use and disclose your information to the extent necessary to allow them to perform the services they provide to us. However, certain third-party service providers, such as payment gateways and other payment transaction processors, have their own privacy policies in respect to the information we are required to provide to them for your purchase-related transactions. For these providers, we recommend that you read their privacy policies so you can understand the manner in which your personal information will be handled by these providers.

In particular, remember that certain providers may be located in or have facilities that are located a different jurisdiction than either you or us. So if you elect to proceed with a transaction that involves the services of a third-party service provider, then your information may become subject to the laws of the jurisdiction(s) in which that service provider or its facilities are located. As an example, if you are located in Canada and your transaction is processed by a payment gateway located in the United States, then your personal information used in completing that transaction may be subject to disclosure under United States legislation, including the Patriot Act.

Once you leave our store’s website or are redirected to a third-party website or application, you are no longer governed by this Privacy Policy or our website’s Terms of Service.

Links When you click on links on our store, they may direct you away from our site. We are not responsible for the privacy practices of other sites and encourage you to read their privacy statements.

SECTION 6 - SECURITY

To protect your personal information, we take reasonable precautions and follow industry best practices to make sure it is not inappropriately lost, misused, accessed, disclosed, altered or destroyed.

If you provide us with your credit card information, the information is encrypted using secure socket layer technology (SSL) and stored with a AES-256 encryption.  Although no method of transmission over the Internet or electronic storage is 100% secure, we follow all PCI-DSS requirements and implement additional generally accepted industry standards.

SECTION 7 - COOKIES

BC Hosting uses "cookies". A cookie is a small data file that a web site can transfer to a visitor's hard drive to keep records of the visits to such site. A cookie contains information such as your username and password that helps us recognize the pages you have visited and improve future visits, but the only personal information a cookie can contain is the information that you provide yourself. A cookie cannot read data off of your hard drive or read cookie files created by other sites. Information stored in cookies may be encrypted, however, we do not store your credit card number in cookies. If you prefer not to accept a cookie, you can set your web browser to warn you before accepting cookies or you can refuse all cookies by turning them off in your web browser. However, access to some of our secured web site(s) may require the use of cookies, which you must enable only cookies that get sent back to the originating server. Otherwise, you can still access most of the features on our web site even without accepting a cookie.

SECTION 8 - AGE OF CONSENT

By using this site, you represent that you are at least the age of majority in your state or province of residence, or that you are the age of majority in your state or province of residence and you have given us your consent to allow any of your minor dependents to use this site.

SECTION 9 - CHANGES TO THIS PRIVACY POLICY

We reserve the right to modify this privacy policy at any time, so please review it frequently. Changes and clarifications will take effect immediately upon their posting on the website. If we make material changes to this policy, we will notify you here that it has been updated, so that you are aware of what information we collect, how we use it, and under what circumstances, if any, we use and/or disclose it.

If our store is acquired or merged with another company, your information may be transferred to the new owners so that we may continue to sell products to you.

QUESTIONS AND CONTACT INFORMATION

If you would like to: access, correct, amend or delete any personal information we have about you, register a complaint, or simply want more information contact our Privacy Compliance Officer at info@whitsundaycoastchamber.com.au or by mail at Whitsunday Coast Chamber of Commerce, PO Box 96, Airlie Beach QLD 4802

Latest news

The Curious Case of a QLD Infrastructure Business Case

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

All regions of Queensland want to see more major infrastructure projects to kickstart their economies.

We’re talking about major, significant infrastructure projects with at least a nine-figure price tag that are essential to accommodate the growth of our cities and towns for the next few decades , projects which NSW and Victoria seem to have plenty of. As our southern State counterparts further ramp up investment in infrastructure over the remainder of this decade, construction will continue to lag in Queensland compounded by our ageing workforce.

The Queensland Major Projects Pipeline 2018 report shows that while there are 190 projects valued at $39.9 billion in the pipeline, 98 of them (51%) are still awaiting funding and 17 per cent of the overall pipeline is unlikely to proceed.

Unfortunately, infrastructure announcements have become a key metric for political popularity, and real effective growth planning takes a back seat to governments’ obsession with opinion polls. Too often, projects are committed to before a business case has been prepared, and even before comprehensive analysis of any alternatives has been undertaken.

As a result, funding presents itself the largest hurdle in getting projects up and running due to the business cases not stacking up. At the same time, funding can be given almost on a political whim, despite there being independent bodies at both the federal and state level signalling priority on other more important infrastructure projects.

The State Infrastructure Plan and Building Queensland’s Infrastructure Pipeline Report comprise an extensive list of major infrastructure proposals, yet the business cases - undertaken by the State Government - struggle to convince the Federal Government to hand over funding required to start the projects.

Few things are to blame.

Firstly, in an era of gold-plating our infrastructure, major projects become too expensive and the ROI is considered too low. The lack of long-term thinking when it comes to town planning means corridors are no longer reserved, instead we go underground for our transport infrastructure which is not only outrageously more expensive, but also more hazardous to construct and use, much longer to build, and much more difficult to operate and maintain.

Secondly, as the business case framework is being driven by the States – and not templated by the Federal Government – the assessment process drags on as the back and forth for more information plays out.

Thirdly, as the business cases are never released for public scrutiny, politicians are able to play political football and rely on public and media pressure to try and get projects over the line, or otherwise quashed.

The framework for business cases for major infrastructure projects must change. Early this year in July, Infrastructure Australia released a set of guidelines for future infrastructure projects designed to lift government works to the same level of accountability, planning and cost rigour as the private sector.

Outlined in the guidelines are 11 infrastructure decision-making principles:

  1. Governments should quantify infrastructure problems and opportunities as part of long-term planning processes.
  2. Proponents should identify potential infrastructure needs in response to quantified infrastructure problems.
  3. Proponents should invest in development studies to scope potential responses.
  4. Where an infrastructure need is identified, governments should take steps to ensure potential responses can be delivered efficiently and affordably.
  5. Governments should undertake detailed analysis of a potential project through a full business case and should not announce a preferred option or cost profile before undertaking detailed analysis involving multiple options.
  6. Proponents should assess the viability of alternative funding sources for each potential project.
  7. Project proposals should be independently assessed by an appropriate third party organisation.
  8. Governments and proponents should undertake meaningful stakeholder engagement at each stage, from problem identification and option development to project delivery.
  9. Governments and proponents should publicly release all information supporting their infrastructure decisions.
  10. Governments should commit to, develop and release post-completion reviews.
  11. Where projects are funded as part of a broader program, the corresponding decision-making processes should be robust, transparent and prioritise value for money.

Successful initiatives such as City Deals is a model which needs to be rolled out across the State and the country a lot quicker than it currently is. The announcement of a South East Queensland City Deal, following the success of the Townsville City Deal, is a genuine bi-partisan approach and a step in the absolute right direction when it comes to long-term planning.

Infrastructure needs to separate itself further from politics. The undertaking and success of major projects has been proven to be directly tied to the economy, and our economy is more important to the small business community that political point-scoring.

  Read more >

Contact Us

Allan Milostic
0419 343 345

c/ PO Box 850,
Airlie Beach, Queensland 4802

info@whitsundaycoastchamber.com.au