Media

CCIQ calls for more clarity around new GST distribution

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

The Chamber of Commerce and Industry Queensland (CCIQ) has welcomed the announcement of the Federal Government’s proposed GST arrangement that no state will be worse off but calls on the government to reveal where the extra money will come from.

Following a Productivity Commission report last month which suggested a cumulative cut to Queensland’s GST funding by as much as $11.7 billion by 2026/27, the announcement by Treasurer Scott Morrison provides some temporary relief until the full picture is revealed.

CCIQ Head of Media and Industry, Dan Petrie said that the GST is a policy area that is critically important to all states and reassessing the current formula is a logical first step.

“While a positive step, we must bear in mind that the new GST distribution formula is not tax reform and should not be the end game.

“For years, we’ve been advocating for broader structural reform of the federal tax system, which would leave room for State and Territory governments to remove inefficient taxes such as payroll tax and stamp duties.

“The GST as a consumption tax is not a sacred cow,” Mr Petrie said.

CCIQ remains vigilant on reminding governments at both state and federal levels that it is largely the business sector that collects the tax which pays for the schools, hospitals and government functions the states administer on behalf of the tax payer.

“We are eagerly awaiting the finer details of the new carve up, specifically as to where the extra money will come from.

“If the Federal Government is proposing the money come from its surplus for example, we would obviously take issue with this.

Thursday 5 July, 2018 | By: Daniel Petrie

Source: www.cciq.com.au
 

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“Buy Queensland” is Code for “Buy Union” Under Rushed Procurement Policy Aimed at Business: CCIQ

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

The Chamber of Commerce and Industry Queensland (CCIQ) have called upon the Palaszczuk Government to clarify its position of best industrial relations practice for government projects over $100 million as a matter of urgency.

Head of CCIQ Advocacy, Kate Whittle said the politicisation of the tendering process, changes without consultation with the business sector and preferential treatment for politically aligned organisations to the State Labor government are particularly troubling.

Buy Queensland’ policy initiative which effectively preferences local business for government work is now encompassing a ‘Buy Union’ policy as well.

This move by the government is aimed at ensuring a union workforce is in place for businesses undertaking government work,” Ms Whittle said.

CCIQ maintains that businesses should be able to retain choice in the make-up of their workforce and it not the role of government irrespective of politician persuasion to insist on a preferred model of industrial relations.

Feedback received from business to date has been confusion around how the criteria will be applied, and a genuine fear that unions will have a greater say in what businesses should be awarded which contracts when it comes to the assessment of tenders.

“The Chamber is also increasingly concerned that this government is in the business of developing policy on the run, while giving lip-service to Queensland’s business community on proper consultation; we saw this at its worst with the announcement of the waste levy,” Ms Whittle said.

With major works across Queensland on the horizon, the Queensland Government must urgently get its house in order and issue directives as to what it means by ‘best practice industrial relations’ or better still, abandon such arbitrary criteria in favour of the strict requirements already in place for tendering for government contracts.

As a member of the Procurement Industry Advisory Group (PIAG), the Chamber of Commerce and Industry Queensland (CCIQ) said it would raise its concerns directly with the responsible Minister.

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Federal Labor Must Reverse its Tax Repeal Stance

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Bill Shorten’s “Captain’s Call” on repealing tax cuts for small businesses will have devastating effect on the jobs prospects of Queenslanders.

Mr. Shorten announced that the Federal Labor Party will repeal the legislated tax cuts for businesses with annual turnover of between $10 million and $50 million.

Don’t be fooled, it isn’t the big banks and billionaires that will suffer under Mr. Shorten’s position, but the mum and dad family run businesses that employ locals in our communities.

An independent grocery store in Caboolture can have a turnover well in excess of $10 million yet operate on razor thin profit margins. Is this type of business that Mr Shorten wants to target?

This is your local pharmacist, your local grocer, your local butcher. These are our community leaders and local employers giving jobs to our kids.

This is a line in the sand for local businesses already suffering from rising costs at every turn.

We must celebrate our local businesses, not demonize them.

Mr. Shorten made a call without the support of Shadow Cabinet or indeed his colleagues in the party room.

Will Susan Lamb rule out supporting her boss on repealing tax relief for local mum and dad businesses?

Or will Susan Lamb shun local business in favour of a thought bubble from Canberra?

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State Budget 2018 -19

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

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Marine Business Wins Award to Lead the Way

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

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Edition #21 / 6 July 2018

Saturday, July 07, 2018

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Networking @ Mantra Club Croc July 2018

Thursday, July 05, 2018

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Is Marine Airbnb-Style Leasing Possible In The Whitsundays?

Tuesday, July 03, 2018


It could be a case of “whatever floats your boat”, but the possibility that legislation will be relaxed later this month to allow berths on marine vessels to be rented out – Airbnb style – is gaining ground.

Currently, boat owners in Australia are allowed to rent out their vessel, or a space on it, but this changes the classification of the vessel from recreational to commercial, and extra requirements must be met.

The Australian Marine Safety Authority recently released for public consultation, open until June 25, a proposed change which would allow recreational boat owners with boats in marinas to let their boats out for a fee for short-term overnight accommodation.

Marina Industries Association chairman Andrew Chapman said in a statement at the end of May that the board supported the change as “it has the potential to expose new people to the social and recreational benefits of marinas and to the boating lifestyle and in doing so bring new customers and revenue into the marina economy”.

Mr Chapman said the use of boats within a marina would be subject to the written approval of the marina, “giving marina operators control over the use within their facility”.

More sceptical of the future of Airbnb-style boating is a former commodore of Whitsunday Sailing Club, Stuart Harris, who lived on his boat, Munn, for 27 years until Cyclone Debbie destroyed the vessel.

“I think there’s too many logistics to see it working,” he said this week.

Mr Harris said concerns included the potential impact on the charter boating industry, safety on board the boats, and the demographic of many of the people who would be seeking to rent the boats.

“I don’t see it as a feasible option. I’m sure there’s people who’d be willing to try it, though.

“I don’t know how the charter boat industry would feel about it because people are coming up from down south and pre-booking their holidays on the charter boats and they can be about $2000 a week per person with up to 10 people.

“If somebody was to start an Airbnb-style operation with their own personal craft, I think there would be some sort of aggravation.”

Mr Harris said the bareboat industry was highly regulated and the change could “open up a can of worms in so far as the boat owners would leave themselves open to litigation in case anything goes wrong”.

Shag Islet Cruising Yacht Club founder Ken Thackeray agreed that safety issues would need to be comprehensively addressed.

“The thing about it is each boat is a unique thing, and you would really need to have somebody do an introduction to each boat as every boat has its own power systems,” he said.

“When you charter a boat, you get at least a 2.5-hour briefing.

“I would think there would have to be some sort of briefing.”

However, he said the concept sounded “great” and could be “quite a novelty”.

The founder of Flotespace, Hugh Treseder, said his online marketplace would enable boats berthed in marinas to be used for overnight accommodation.

Mr Treseder, who has not yet met with Abell Point Marina in the Whitsundays, said his start-up would allow people to hire boats for overnight accommodation and day-time work environments.

“We’re working closely with marinas and we want to put health and safety first,” he said.

He said the booking system would be “transparent” and thorough documentation would be provided.

“And the boat must remain berthed in the marina. Each marina is different so would be looked at case by case. We’re meeting with people all over the country to shape it to their individual needs.”

Mr Treseder said he hoped people would get a “unique” experience by being able to sleep over on a boat – “everyone from active retirees to people looking for an adventure”.

He said the business was currently in the “research and development” phase to understand “how we can add value, not just in monetary terms, but to the marinas and small businesses around them”.

Source: Whitsunday Times.

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Are You Ready For The Bag Ban?

Tuesday, July 03, 2018


Whitsundays supermarkets have well and truly jumped the gun on the plastic bag ban as Woolworths introduced reuseable bags to shoppers yesterday and Airlie Beach IGA introduced its own ban 15 months ago.

As of yesterday, Woolies stores across Queensland, and Australia, have stopped the use of lightweight plastic bags. The ban extends to all Woolworths Group stores, including BigW.

The plastic bag ban is set to come into effect on July 1, however Woolworths isn’t the only supermarket in the Whitsunday region to have raced ahead of the game.

Airlie Beach IGA in Jubilee Pocket was the first supermarket in the region to go plastic bag free, although other IGA franchises still use heavyweight plastic bags.

Co-owner Belynda Martin said Airlie Beach IGA introduced its own ban 15months ago after the devastation of Cyclone Debbie left a mass of debris in the ocean.

Ms Martin said the response from customers had been fabulous so far, although some still forget to bring reuseable bags, which led to the introduction of a cashback incentive.

“Our customers are already good with bringing in their own bags now, but some still forget,” she said.

“As an incentive, after July 1, customers will receive a 5c cashback for every reuseable bag that they bring back in to Airlie Beach IGA.”

Undeterred by its main competitors, Coles will go ahead with original plans to replace single-use plastic bags with reuseable bags on July 1.

The ban will effectively remove single-use plastic bags and lightweight plastic shopping bags.

Shoppers will still have access to bags for groceries such as fruit and vegetables, as well as garbage bags and bin liners. Thicker plastic bags can also be purchased for 15c from larger retailers such as Coles, Woolworths and most IGAs.

Plastic bag ban

  • WHEN: IGA 2017, Woolworths June 20, Coles July 1.
  • BANNED: Single-use plastic bags and degradable and biodegradeable plastic shopping bags.
  • ALLOWED: Fruit and vegetable bags, bin liners, garbage bags, nappy bags, dog poo bags and department store plastic bags.

Source: Whitsunday Times.

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Airlie Beach Foreshore Revitalisation To Begin End Of July

Tuesday, June 19, 2018


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Latest news

CCIQ calls for more clarity around new GST distribution

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

The Chamber of Commerce and Industry Queensland (CCIQ) has welcomed the announcement of the Federal Government’s proposed GST arrangement that no state will be worse off but calls on the government to reveal where the extra money will come from.

Following a Productivity Commission report last month which suggested a cumulative cut to Queensland’s GST funding by as much as $11.7 billion by 2026/27, the announcement by Treasurer Scott Morrison provides some temporary relief until the full picture is revealed.

CCIQ Head of Media and Industry, Dan Petrie said that the GST is a policy area that is critically important to all states and reassessing the current formula is a logical first step.

“While a positive step, we must bear in mind that the new GST distribution formula is not tax reform and should not be the end game.

“For years, we’ve been advocating for broader structural reform of the federal tax system, which would leave room for State and Territory governments to remove inefficient taxes such as payroll tax and stamp duties.

“The GST as a consumption tax is not a sacred cow,” Mr Petrie said.

CCIQ remains vigilant on reminding governments at both state and federal levels that it is largely the business sector that collects the tax which pays for the schools, hospitals and government functions the states administer on behalf of the tax payer.

“We are eagerly awaiting the finer details of the new carve up, specifically as to where the extra money will come from.

“If the Federal Government is proposing the money come from its surplus for example, we would obviously take issue with this.

Thursday 5 July, 2018 | By: Daniel Petrie

Source: www.cciq.com.au
 

  Read more >

Contact Us

Allan Milostic
0419 343 345

c/ PO Box 850,
Airlie Beach, Queensland 4802

info@whitsundaycoastchamber.com.au